Psychology


Your experiences give you a perspective unique to who you are. Your education will, too. In our psychology programs you'll dive into the human behavior and emotion to gain the knowledge, skills, and compassion to identify strengths and honor the perspective of each person you meet.

You can earn a BS or BA in Psychology at SAU. Or, in our Forensic Psychology program, study the relationship between the science of psychology and the criminal justice system. Our third psychology program, Behavioral Neuropsychology, involves the biological basis of behavior and thought.

Our graduates work at Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Veterans Administration, Davenport Community Schools, Northwestern University, Family Resources, Family CareSolutions, DMOS Orthopaedic Centers, and many more!

Other Psychology Programs

Forensic Psychology

Behavioral Neuropsychology


Ambrose Advantages

  • One-on-One Advising
  • Internships and Supervised Practicum Experiences
  • Unique Forensic Psychology Program
  • 100% Online BA in Psychology

Julie Kettman in Class

Students in Psych Group

John Stachula in Class

The unlimited potential you see in people is what we see in you, too. Here, textbooks are not enough. Psychology internships will elevate your skills. Faculty will guide your individual education. Encompassing, challenging discussions will broaden your perspective. Our goal is to spark your love for the profession, deepen your empathy, and support your drive to serve.

See our fact sheet on psychology majors (pdf)


Use Art to Help Others

student painting

Art Therapy Minor


Give people a creative way to express their deepest thoughts and feelings. Art and Psychology majors can minor in Art Therapy and create a career focused on service. You can empower clients to unlock, understand, heal, and grow.


More Information on the Psychology Major

What will I learn?

Develop high-quality research and writing skills, become an effective problem solver, and use your higher-level thinking abilities to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information.

Broaden your classroom education and experiences:

  • join the Psychology Club and Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology
  • support organizations in the community such as the National Alliance on Mental Illness
  • volunteer in campus activities
  • participate in research with faculty
  • get practical work experience in the community
  • join professional organizations

Get the most out of your degree
If you want to build on your psychology education, consider our dual degree program that allows you to earn a BA in Psychology and a second degree in Social Work (BSW) in four years.

Lend a hand, learn about the world
We are one of few universities in Iowa offering Peace Corps Prep, a set of courses that can make you a stronger candidate for volunteer positions within the Peace Corps or other service programs. Most students can earn the certificate – awarded by the Peace Corps – without taking extra courses. Click here to learn more or contact your faculty advisor.

Study Abroad

You've heard people say it before: "College will be the greatest time of your life!" With Study Abroad, you can add even more to your college years.

You can study in another country in a semester-long or short-term study abroad program (with a few offered during spring and winterim breaks). No matter the duration, these trips deepen your professional education while earning credit toward graduation.

There are also opportunities through an exchange program, an overseas internship, or volunteering. The limits for Study Abroad are only ones you set for yourself! SAU students have studied in Italy, Costa Rica, Australia, Korea, United Kingdom, Spain, Ecuador, Japan, Germany, Peru, Cyprus, Croatia, Belize, Canada, Chile, and more.

SAU students returning from their Study Abroad locations talk about their time away as life-changing – personally, emotionally, culturally, and academically.

Click here to search our Study Abroad programs, and for general information click here.

Internship and Field Experience

Field Experience

For Psychology majors

You may be taken aback the first time you realize the impact you made in the life of a child or adult who was struggling with issues you've never imagined or just needed someone to listen, care, and offer support. Field experience is a deep commitment and seriously rewarding.

Each semester, Psychology majors can apply to complete 120-hours of on-site field work, supervised by a professor who encourages you to explore, apply what you've learned in the classroom, and applauds your professional, and personal, growth.

Learn more about how Psychology Professor Judy Correa Kaiser, PhD, guides field experience.

Internship

For Forensic Psychology majors

The ability to look beyond a first impression and discover the real person inside – all of their goals, dreams and flaws – is a gift that takes skill, practice, and an endless drive to do more to help a person succeed.

Here, you get hands-on opportunities to develop that gift. Forensic Psychology majors complete a semester-long internship and spend 120-240 hours with clients in inpatient treatment facilities, jails and prisons, state and federal courts, parole facilities, working in youth offender programs, and more.

It is an experience that builds your skills and perspective so you can help people improve their lives. "You have to see people as being greater than the worst thing they've every done," said Griffin Reed '16.

What are some possible job outcomes?

The study of psychology at the bachelor's level is good preparation for many industries, including public affairs, education, business, sales, service industries, and healthcare.

You may work with performers and athletes to reduce stress and improve performance; advise lawyers on jury selection; collaborate with educators on school reform; and help victims and bystanders recover from a disaster.

You could also work as a human resource specialist, employment counselor, correction counselor trainee, interviewer, personnel analyst, parole officer, police officer, market researcher, and lab assistant, as well as a valued employee in a wide array of human services and helping professions.

What have our alums been up to?
  • Clare Sulentic '19 is continuing her education at St. Ambrose in the Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology program.
  • Shelby Leemans '16 added Biology and Chemistry minors to her Psychology degree and earned her MHA from Des Moines University. Today she is a clinic supervisor for Pulmonary Associates (Genesis Health Group).
  • After SAU, Ally Hunter '13 earned her master's degree in Education from WIU. She now works at Geneseo High School as a school counselor.
  • Madison Auge '17, BA Psychology & Biology, works as a Transplant Patient Navigator at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.
  • Cristina Barkowski '15, BA Psychology, works as Coordinator of PROMISE Research Project at Northwestern University.
  • Haley Resewehr '18, BA Psychology and Management, works as a Human Resources Assistant at Ascentra Credit Union.
  • David Gonzalez '12, BA Psychology, works as a Behavioral Health Clinician at the Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery.
  • Chloe Czolgosz '18, BA Psychology, works as a Counseling Intern at Ball Memorial Hospital Cancer Center, Indiana.
  • Joaquin Bueno Diaz '19, BA Psychology, works as an Immigrant Counselor & Advocate at Family Resources.
  • Hannah Bellman '19, BA Psychology, works as a Family Involvement Liaison for Davenport Community Schools.
  • David Adams '11, BA Psychology, is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist at Joy Miller & Associates Counseling and Wellness Services in Illinois
Faculty

Jennifer Best, MS Ed, Dept. Coordinator

Carol DeVolder, PhD, Professor
Andy Kaiser, PhD, Professor
Judy Correa Kaiser, PhD, Professor
Julie Jenks Kettmann, PhD, Assoc. Professor
Katrina Okerstrom-Jezewski, Asst. Professor
John Stachula, PhD, Professor
Katie Trujillo, PhD, Professor

Dual Degree Programs

BSW-Psychology

With our new Dual Degree program, you can earn a BA in Psychology and a second degree in Social Work. 

Your reasons to study psychology may be the same as why people go into social work. We've created a dual degree program that allows you to earn a degree in Psychology and a second degree in Social Work, all in four years. This well-integrated program connects the two degrees and leads to a successful career.

Psychology majors benefit from unique coursework on mental health, developmental and social influences on human behavior, as well as on how the brain functions. This background provides a solid foundation for developing the skills that social workers need when assessing and counseling clients and offers an extra layer of understanding and insight into client issues and motivations.

Further, psychology's roots in answering questions about human behavior through conducting scientific research prepare social workers to understand and design research in their field that will allow them to use best practices with clients and organizations.

Our 32-credit hour BSW program focuses on generalist practice, which means you'll gain skills that allow you to practice in various settings: hospitals, clinical settings, schools, social service agencies, and more. You'll build social work practice skills that encompass an empowerment philosophy and allow you to work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities in a variety of settings with diverse populations.

In addition, your BSW could lead to advanced standing in our accredited MSW program, which means you could earn your graduate degree in one year, instead of two. That makes your education more accelerated and affordable.

Plan to Graduate - PSYC and BSW

This is the suggested Plan to Graduate in four years with a BSW degree and a BA in Psychology.

This plan assumes you haven't satisfied the foreign language requirement (three years of foreign language in high school). 

Year One

FallCreditsSpringCredits
New Student Seminar (NSS) 1 STAT 213 Statistics 3
MATH 171 Elem. Functions 3 Humanities 3
Foreign Language 101 3 Foreign Language 102 3
PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology 3 IL 101 Information Literacy (8 weeks) 1
THEO/PHIL 3 SWK 201 Intro to Social Work 3
ENGL 101 Composition 3 COMM 3
Total 16 Total 16


Year Two

FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 101 (+Lab) 4 PSYC 324 Abnormal Psychology 3
PSYC 215 Research Methods 3 PSCI 101 American Government 3
PSYC 255 Brain and Behavior 3 PSYC (Category I) 3
Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3 300-level PSYC elective 3
THEO/PHIL 3 KIN 149 Wellness (8 weeks) 1
Total 16 Total 13


Year Three

FallCreditsSpringCredits
WI-PSYC 342 Theories of Counseling 3 SWK 310 Social Welfare and Policy 3
SWK 330 Generalist Practice I 3 SWK 325 HBSE 3
Creative Arts Gen Ed 3 THEO/PHIL 300-Level 3
SWK 360 Diversity 3 Elective 3
SWK 320 HBSE I Birth to Adolescence 3 SWK 333 Generalist Practice II 3
Total 15 Total 15


Year Four

FallCreditsSpringCredits
SWK 400 Field Instruction I 3 SWK 336 Generalist Practice III 3
SWK 402 Field Seminar I 1 SWK 401 Field Instruction II 3
SWK 340 Social Work Research 3 SWK 403 Field Seminar II 3
PSYC (Category III) 3 PSYC (Category IV) 3
KIN Activity 1 PSYC Capstone 4
Psychology Major Field Test 0
Total 14 Total 16
BS-MPH or BA-MPH (3+2)

Earn your bachelor's and master's degree together in five years!

Completing two degrees together saves you time and tuition. We've mapped out the courses and course sequence below on how to make that possible.

Plan to Graduate - BA-MPH

This is the suggested Plan to Graduate in four years with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and a Master of Public Health. This plan assumes you haven't satisfied the foreign language requirement (three years of foreign language in high school).

Some courses have prerequisites. Check the online course catalog for details.

Year One

FallCreditsSpringCredits
KIN 149 Wellness Concepts 1 STAT 213 Statistics 3
ENGL 101 Composition 3 Humanities 3
Foreign Language 101 3 Foreign Language 102 3
PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology 3 PHIL/THEO 3
ENGL 101 Composition 3 Oral Communication 3
New Student Seminar 1 InfoLit 1
Total 16 Total 16


Year Two

FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOL 101 or 199+Lab 4 Creative Arts 3
PSYC 215 Research Methods 3 PSYC (Category II) 3
Introduction to Health Sciences Professions 2 Humanities 3
PSYC 255 Brain and Behavior 3 PSYC (Category I) 3
Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3 THEO/PHIL 300-level 3
Total 15 Total 15


Year Three

FallCreditsSpringCredits
PSYC (Category III) 3 WI-PSYC 3
PSYC 300-level elective 3 PSYC (Category IV) 3
CHEM 103+Lab Principles of Chemistry 4 KIN Activity 1
Minor 3 Elective/2nd Major/Minor 6
Elective 3
Total 15 Total 13


Year Four

FallCreditsSpringCredits
PSYC Capstone 4 Any WI course 3
Psychology Major Field Test N/A Minor 3
KIN 149 Wellness Concepts 1 Elective 3
Minor 3 MPH 525 Biostats and Quant. Research (8 weeks) 3
MPH 510 Global Public Health (8 weeks) 3 MPH 530 Qualitative Research (8 weeks) 3
MPH 516 Applied Practicum (8 weeks) 1
MPH 520 Epidemiology (8 weeks) 3
Total 15 Total 15


SUMMER
MPH 610 Evidence-based Practice, 3 credits
MPH 670 Global Health Systems, 3 credits

Year Five

Courses in Year Five are delivered online. 

FallCreditSpringCredit
MPH 515 (1st 8 weeks) 3 MPH 620 (1st 8 weeks) 3
MPH 680 (1st 8 weeks) 3 MPH 625 (1st 8 weeks) 3
MPH 540 (2nd 8 weeks) 3 MPH 630 (2nd 8 weeks) 3
MPH 690 (2nd 8 weeks) 3 MPH 700 (2nd 8 weeks) 3
Total 12 Total 12

*Liberal Arts Perspective History category must be from 2 different departments
**PSYC 294/394 Research Practicum (if would like to take Research course for credit PSYC 105- Must talk to Psych Advisor); Volunteering, Psychology Club, Exploration of Graduate School
*** WI-PSYC 342 & WI-PSYC 314 have an additional pre-req

Plan to Graduate - BS-MPH

This is the suggested Plan to Graduate in four years with a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and a Master of Public Health. This plan assumes you haven't satisfied the foreign language requirement (three years of foreign language in high school).

Some courses have prerequisites. Check the online course catalog for details.

MPH courses are delivered online and asynchronously.

Year One

FallCreditSpringCredit
English Composition 101 (Gen Ed) 3 Oral Communication (Gen Ed) 3
MATH 171 Elementary Functions 3 STAT 213 Applied Stats/Science (Gen Ed) 3
Second Language 101 (Gen Ed) 3 Catholic Intellectual Tradition (Gen Ed) 3
PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology 3 Second Language 102 (Gen Ed) 3
New Student Seminar 1 *Liberal Arts Perspective  (Gen Ed ) 3
KIN 149 Wellness Concepts (Gen Ed) 1 **Experiential Learning NA
KIN Activity Course or Samaritan 1-2
Total Credits 15-1 6 Total Credits 15

Year Two

FallCreditSpringCredit
Liberal Arts Perspective: Natural Science (Rec. BIOL 101 or 1991) + Lab (Gen Ed) 4 *Liberal Arts Perspective  (Gen Ed ) or PHYS 204 3-4
PSYC 215 Research Methods 3 PSYC 255 Brain & Behavior 3
Catholic Intellectual Tradition (Gen Ed) 3 WI Course (200 or 300 any department) 3
NSCI 105 Physical Sciences or PHYS 2033 4 Catholic Intellectual Tradition (Gen Ed) PHIL or THEO 300 Level 3
*Liberal Arts Perspective  (Gen Ed ) 3 Elective or BIOL 200 3-4
**Experiential Learning   NA **Experiential Learning NA
Total Credits 1 7 Total Credits 15-17

Year Three

FallCreditSpringCredit
PSYC 330 Psychology of Learning 3 PSYC 300-level 3
PSYC 403 Behavioral Neuroscience 3 PSYC 360 Psychopharmacology 3
CHEM 103 (or 105)2 4 Elective Any 3
Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3 Elective Any or CHEM 106 3-4
*Liberal Arts Perspective (Gen Ed ) 3 Elective /Second Major or Minor 3
**Experiential Learning NA **Experiential Learning NA
Total Credits 16 Total Credits 15-16

Year Four

Fall 1, Spring 1, etc. refers to the first 8 weeks of the fall semester.

FallCreditSpringCredit
WI-PSYC 404 Adv Exp Design/Analysis 4 PSYC 402 Sensation & Perception 3
**Experiential Learning NA PSYC 300 or 400 level 3
Major Field Test (Required for Graduation) Electives/Second Major or Minor 3
Elective 3 **Experiential Learning NA
Fall 1 MPH 510 Global Public Health 3 Spring 1 MPH 525 Biostats 3
Fall 1 MPH 516 Appl Practicum/Integrated Exp 1 Spring 2 MPH 530 Qualitative Research 3
Fall 2 MPH 520 Epidemiology 3
Total Credits 14 Total Credits 15

Summer

MPH 610 Evidence-Based Practice, 3 credits
MPH 670 Global Health Systems, 3 credits

Year Five

FallCreditSpringCredit
Fall 1 MPH 515 Health Promotion/Communication 3 Spring 1 MPH 620 Global Health Policy 3
Fall 1 MPH 680 Management Leadership 3 Spring 1 MPH 625 Applied Practicum Experience 3
Fall 2 MPH 540 Beh/Env/Soc 3 Spring 2 MPH 630 Equity/Ethics 3
Fall 2 MPH 690 Community Health Analysis 3 Spring 2 MPH 700 Integrated Learning Experience 3
Total Credits 12 Total Credits 12

*Liberal Arts Perspective History category must be from two different departments
**PSYC 294 /394 Research Practicum (if would like to take Research course for credit PSYC 105- Must talk to Psych Advisor); Volunteering, Psychology Club, Exploration of Graduate School)
***WI-PSYC 342 & WI-PSYC 314 have an additional pre-req;
1Must take BIOL 200
2Must Take CHEM 106
3Must take PHYS 204

Degree Requirements

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (34 credits)

Read course descriptions in the course catalog

Required (with minimum C grade):
+PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology 
STAT 213 Applied Statistical Reasoning for the Sciences
PSYC 215 Research Methods
PSYC 255 Brain and Behavior

Capstone, 4 credits (choose one):
PSYC 425 Professional Development and Integration in Psychology (JR/SR standing required)
WI-PSYC 404 Advanced Experimental Design and Analysis
PSYC 420 Supervised Psychology Practicum
HON 401 Honors Course

At least one course each from Category PLUS 2 additional courses from any category:

Category I:
PSYC 212 Life-Span Developmental Psychology
PSYC 306 Social Psychology
WI-PSYC 312 Women and Aging
PSYC 323 Personality Theories
PSYC 384 Adv. Child and Adolescent Development

Category II: 
PSYC 324 Abnormal Psychology
PSYC 326 Abnormal Child and Adolescent Psychology
PSYC 332 Psychology Tests and Measurements 
PSYC 343 Family Systems and Counseling

Category III: 
PSYC 314 Human Motivation
PSYC 330 Psychology of Learning
PSYC 340 Cognitive Psychology
PSYC 360 Behavioral Pharmacology
PSYC 402 Psychology of Sensation and Perception 
PSYC 403 Behavioral Neuroscience

Category IV:
PSYC 205 Human Sexuality
PSYC 321 Psychology and Law
PSYC 327 Psychology and Treatment of the Juvenile Offender
PSYC 328 Psychology and Treatment of Trauma and the Victim
PSYC 350 Health Psychology

Other:
PSYC 294/304/494 Research Practicum
PSY 342 Theories of Counseling
PSYC 325 Criminal Behavior

Read course descriptions

Plan to Graduate – BA in Psychology

This is the suggested plan of study to graduate in four years with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology. This plan assumes the student has not satisfied the foreign language requirement (three years of high school foreign language).

Check the online course catalog for prerequisites.

Year One

FallCreditSpringCredit
+ENGL 101 Composition 3 Oral Communication 3
MATH 171 Elementary Functions 3 +STAT 213 Applied Stats/Science 3
+Foreign Language 101 3 +Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3
PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology 3 +Foreign Language 102 3
CRJU 101 Intro to Criminal Justice 3 +*Liberal Arts Perspective 3
New Student Seminar 1 KIN Activity 1-2
KIN 149 1
Total Credits 17 Total Credits 16-17

Year Two

FallCreditSpringCredit
+Liberal Arts Perspective: Natural Science (Rec. BIOL 101, 120; CHEM 101) + Lab 3-4 +*Liberal Arts Perspective 3
PSYC 215 Research Methods 3 PSYC 255 Brain and Behavior 3
+*Liberal Arts Perspective 6 Elective/2nd Major/Minor 3
+Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3 +PHIL/THEO 300-Level 3
**Experiential Learning WI-Course (200 or 300 any department) 3
**Experiential Learning
Total Credits 15-16 Total Credits 15

Year Three

FallCreditSpringCredit
PSYC 200-300-Level 3 ***WI-PSYC or PSYC 300-level 3
PSYC 300-level or WI-PSYC 3 PSYC 300-level 3
Elective 3 Elective 3
Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3 300-Level Elective or Minor 3
Elective/2nd Major/Minor 3 Elective/2nd Major/Minor 3
**Experiential Learning **Experiential Learning
Total Credits 15 Total Credits 15

Year Four

FallCreditSpringCredit
PSYC 421 Forensic Psychology Capstone (take in Fall or Spring) 4 PSYC 300-400-level 6
PSYC 300-400-level 3 Electives/2nd Major/Minor 9
300-level Electives 6 **Experiential Learning
Elective/2nd Major/Minor 3
**Experiential Learning
Major Field Test (Required for Graduation)
Total Credits 16 Total Credits 15

+Fulfills a general education requirement
*Liberal Arts Perspective History category must be from 2 different departments
**PSYC 294/394 Research Practicum (if taking Research course for credit PSYC 105- Must talk to Psych Advisor); Volunteering, Psychology Club, Exploration of Graduate School)
***WI-PSYC 342 and WI-PSYC 314 have an additional pre-req

Bachelor of Science in Psychology (34 credits)

Required

Core
+PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology (C or better)
STAT 213 Applied Statistical Reasoning for the Sciences (C+ or better)
PSYC 215 Research Methods (C+ or better)
PSYC 255 Brain and Behavior (C or better)

Capstone
PSYC 404 Experimental Design in Psychology, 4 credits

Choose at least one course from each of the following categories, plus 2 from any category:

Category I
PSYC 212 Life-Span Developmental Psychology
PSYC 306 Social Psychology
WI-PSYC 312 Women and Aging
PSYC 323 Personality Theories
PSYC 384 Adv. Child and Adolescent Development

Category II:
PSYC 324 Abnormal Psychology
PSYC 326 Abnormal Child and Adolescent Psychology
PSYC 332 Psychology Tests and Measurements
PSYC 343 Family Systems and Counseling

Category III:
PSYC 314 Human Motivation
PSYC 330 Psychology of Learning
PSYC 340 Cognitive Psychology
PSYC 360 Behavioral Pharmacology
PSYC 402 Psychology of Sensation and Perception 
PSYC 403 Behavioral Neuroscience

Category IV:
PSYC 205 Human Sexuality
PSYC 321 Psychology and Law
PSYC 327 Psychology and Treatment of the Juvenile Offender
PSYC 328 Psychology and Treatment of Trauma and the Victim
PSYC 350 Health Psychology

Other:
PSYC 294/304/494 Research Practicum
PSYC 342 Theories of Counseling
PSYC 325 Criminal Behavior

Non-departmental requirements:
BIOL 101, or 199 and 200;
CHEM 103, or 105 and 106;
CSCI 140 OR 195 OR 281;
MATH 171 (or higher level math) (MATH 191 is strongly recommended for graduate school).

Read course descriptions

Plan to Graduate – BS in Psychology

This is the suggested plan of study to graduate in four years with a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology. This plan assumes the student has not satisfied the foreign language requirement (three years of high school foreign language).

Check the online course catalog for prerequisites.

Year One

FallCreditSpringCredit
+ENGL 101 Composition 3 +Oral Communication 3
MATH 171 Elementary Functions 3 +STAT 213 Applied Stats/Science 3
+Foreign Language 101 3 +Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3
PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology 3 +Foreign Language 102 3
KIN activity 1-2 +*Liberal Arts Perspective 3
New Student Seminar 1 **Experiential Learning
Total Credits 15-16 Total Credits 15

Year Two

FallCreditSpringCredit
+Liberal Arts Perspective: Natural Science BIOL 199+Lab 4 +*Liberal Arts Perspective 3
PSYC 215 Research Methods 3 PSYC 255 Brain and Behavior 3
+Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3 Elective or BIOL 200 3-4
CSCI 140, 195, or 281 3 +PHIL/THEO 300 Level 3
+Liberal Arts Perspective 3 WI-Course (200 or 300 any department) 3
**Experiential Learning **Experiential Learning
Total Credits 16 Total Credits 15-16

Year Three

FallCreditSpringCredit
PSYC 200-300-level 3 WI-PSYC or PSYC 300-level elective 3
PSYC 300-level or WI-PSYC 3 PSYC 300-level 3
+*Liberal Arts Perspective 3 Elective 3
CHEM 103 or 105 4 Elective or CHEM 106 3-4
Catholic Intellectual Tradition 3 Elective/2nd Major/Minor 3
**Experiential Learning **Experiential Learning
Total Credits 16 Total Credits 15-16

Year Four

FallCreditSpringCredit
WI-PSYC 404 Capstone (can take in fall or spring) 4 Electives/2nd Major/Minor 9
Elective/2nd Major/Minor 3 PSYC 300 or 400 level 6
300-level Electives 9 **Experiential Learning
Major Field Test (Required for Graduation)
**Experiential Learning
Total Credits 16 Total Credits 15

+Fulfills a general education requirement
*Liberal Arts Perspective History category must be from 2 different departments
**PSYC 294/394 Research Practicum (if taking Research course for credit PSYC 105- Must talk to Psych Advisor); Volunteering, Psychology Club, Exploration of Graduate School)
***WI-PSYC and WI-PSYC 314 have an additional pre-req

Minor in Psychology (15 credits)

Required:
+PSYC 105 Introductory Psychology
PSYC 215 (C or better) Research Methods
+STAT 213 (C or better) Applied Statistical Reasoning for the Sciences
At least two or more 300-level PSYC

Requirements for Occupational Therapy students completing an undergraduate degree in psychology: Students should contact their Psychology faculty advisor for current information.

Art Therapy Minor (24 credits)

The minor in art therapy is structured for Art or Psychology majors who are interested in how creative expression can improve individuals' well-being.

Required Core:
+AD 100 Drawing
AD 215 Introduction to Art Therapy
PSYC 105 Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 215 Research Methods

Required for Art majors

PSYC 212 Life-span Development
PSYC 324 Abnormal Psychology
PSYC 342 Theories of Counseling

Choose One (3 credits):
PSYC 327 Psychology & Treatment of the Juvenile Offender
PSYC 384 Child & Adolescent Psychology

Required for Psychology majors

+AD 120 3D Design
+AD 190 Digital Photography
+AD 220 Printmaking

Choose One (3 credits):
+AD 225 Papermaking
+AD 230 Intermediate Special Topics
+AD 260 Bookbinding
+AD 270 Painting I

Scholarships and Grants

Undergraduate Scholarships

For academic/merit-based awards, eligible students are matched to the qualifying award; some of them are listed below.

For need-based support, eligibility is determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The SAU school code is 001889.

You may also qualify for a scholarship or grant due to your talent in the fine arts or athletics, contact the Admissions Office so we can help be sure you're getting what you need. (You're also encouraged to seek outside scholarships and begin that search early.)

First-Year Scholarships

Amounts are for first-year students entering St. Ambrose in the 2020-21 academic year. Students entering SAU for the 2021-22 school year please scroll down.

There is no need to apply for the scholarships or grants below; students automatically are eligible if they meet specific criteria. The Admissions Office calculates the award amount by using unweighted high school GPA and ACT/SAT scores*.

Your scholarship will automatically renew each year of your undergraduate studies, for up to four years, as long as you maintain satisfactory progress toward an undergraduate degree, a minimum 2.0 GPA, and remain a full-time student. 

FOR STUDENTS LIVING ON CAMPUS

2020-21 On Campus (Merit-Based Scholarships)

Ambrose Advantage Scholarships
Criteria: Iowa resident, Pell Grant eligible, 2020 high school graduate, min. unweighted GPA 2.8, admitted to SAU and FAFSA filed by Mar. 15
Award: Full Tuition

Trustee Scholarships
Criteria: unweighted 3.9 GPA and minimum 29 ACT or 1340 SAT score
Award: $25,000/year and invited to compete for a full tuition scholarship

Presidential Scholarships
Criteria: minimum unweighted 3.8 GPA and 28 ACT or 1310 SAT score
Award: $23,000/year

Academic Scholarships
Criteria: based on unweighted GPA and ACT/SAT score
Award: $15,000-$21,000/year

University Grants
Criteria: based on unweighted GPA and ACT/SAT score
$13,000/year

On Campus (Additional Institutional Scholarships)

Fr. Welch Alumni Scholarships
Criteria: parent is a St. Ambrose graduate
Award: $1,000/year

Freeman Pollard Diversity Awards
Criteria: ethnically diverse student; FAFSA required. Additional aid available.
Award: $1,000/year on campus


FOR STUDENTS LIVING OFF CAMPUS

Off Campus (Merit-Based Scholarships)

Academic Scholarships
Criteria: based on unweighted GPA and ACT/SAT score
Award: $13,000-$16,000/year (Iowa resident) or $13,000-16,000/year (non-Iowa resident)

University Grants
Criteria: based on unweighted GPA and ACT/SAT score
Award: $11,000/year

Off-Campus (Additional Institutional Scholarships)

Fr. Welch Alumni Scholarships
Criteria: parent is a St. Ambrose graduate
Award: $500/year

Freeman Pollard Diversity Awards
Criteria: ethnically diverse student; FAFSA required. Additional aid available.
Award: $500/year

*While St. Ambrose University has a Test-Optional admissions policy, standardized test scores are required for admission to specific programs and eligibility for top academic scholarships.


2021-22 Scholarships

FOR STUDENTS LIVING ON CAMPUS

On Campus (Merit-Based Scholarships)

Ambrose Advantage
Criteria: Iowa resident, Pell Grant eligible, 2021 high school graduate, min. unweighted GPA 2.8, admitted to SAU and FAFSA filed by Mar. 15
Award: Full tuition

Trustee
Criteria: unweighted 3.9 GPA and minimum 29 ACT or 1340 SAT score
Award: $25,000/year and invited to compete for a full tuition scholarship

Presidential
Criteria: minimum unweighted 3.8 GPA and 28 ACT or 1310 SAT score
Award: $23,000/year

Academic
Criteria: based on unweighted GPA and ACT/SAT score (optional)
Award: $15,000-$21,000/year

University Grant
Criteria: based on unweighted GPA and ACT/SAT score (optional)
$13,000/year

On Campus (Additional Institutional Scholarships)

Fr. Welch Alumni Scholarships
Criteria: parent is a St. Ambrose graduate
Award: $1,000/year

Freeman Pollard Diversity Awards
Criteria: ethnically diverse student; FAFSA required. Additional aid available.
Award: $500-$1,000/year


FOR STUDENTS LIVING OFF CAMPUS

Off Campus (Merit-Based Scholarships)

Academic Scholarships
Criteria: based on unweighted GPA and ACT/SAT score (optional)
Award: $13,000-$16,000/year (Iowa resident) or $14,000-17,000/year (non-Iowa resident)

University Grants
Criteria: based on unweighted GPA and ACT/SAT score
Award: $11,000/year

Off-Campus (Additional Institutional Scholarships)

Fr. Welch Alumni Scholarships
Criteria: parent is a St. Ambrose graduate
Award: $500/year

Freeman Pollard Diversity Awards
Criteria: ethnically diverse student; FAFSA required.
Award: $500/year

International Student Scholarships

At SAU, our international students can qualify for university scholarships and grants based on academic achievement, merit, and their performance and abilities in fine arts and athletics.

Below, you'll find a quick summary of financial awards, and we continually look for ways to make an Ambrosian education even more affordable and attainable. Recently, we began offering athletic scholarships for Marching Band and Esports.

If you have any questions or want to apply, please contact the International Student Admissions office. 

Institutional Scholarships (2020-21)
There is no need to apply for the scholarships or grants below; students are automatically are eligible if they meet specific criteria, although some may require a certain GPA to stay eligible.

Academic Scholarship – $15,000-$21,000/year

Athletic Scholarships
We have many international student-athletes who are contributing and growing their skills as valued team players. As a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), St. Ambrose can award athletic scholarships to student-athletes. The amount varies and is based on performance and ability. These scholarships allow you to earn a college education while competing in the sport that you love. At Ambrose, we embody the value of developing both the mind and body.

To qualify for an athletic scholarship you must be eligible to play a sport at St. Ambrose. You can read about those qualifications here. The NAIA also has a complete website on how to register for eligibility at playNAIA.org

To learn more about all of our athletic teams and opportunities – including Esports – click here

Fine Arts Scholarships

These scholarships are based on your performance and ability in art, music, or theatre, and you may qualify for the Michael Kennedy Theatre Scholarship. Audition or portfolio required. Contact the Admissions office to apply or for more information. 

See below to learn more about outside scholarships and we encourage you to begin your search early.

Transfer Scholarships

Amounts are for transfer students entering St. Ambrose in the 2020-21 academic year. Please scroll down for 2021-22 information.

St. Ambrose scholarships are awarded for fall and spring semesters only* and renewable up to 120 credits of undergraduate study, which includes credits transferred to St. Ambrose from prior attendance. For example: If you transfer in with an AA/AS degree, you would receive a scholarship for two additional years at St. Ambrose.

*Total combined scholarships may not exceed cost of tuition

2020-21 Scholarships

Phi Theta Kappa
Criteria: awarded to all Phi Theta Kappa National Honor Society members transferring from a community college
Award: $15,500

OR

Transfer Academic Scholarships
Criteria: based on GPA
Awards (non-Iowa residents):
3.5-4.00 GPA $15,000 
3.0-3.49 GPA $14,000
2.5-2.99 GPA $13,000 
2.0-2.49 GPA $11,000 

Awards (Iowa residents):
3.5-4.00 GPA $13,000 
3.0-3.49 GPA $12,000
2.5-2.99 GPA $11,000 
2.0-2.49 GPA $10,000 

Fr. Welch Alumni Scholarships
Criteria: parent is a St. Ambrose graduate
Award: $1,000 per year (on campus); $500/year (off campus)

Dual Admission Scholarships
Criteria: participant in SAU/community college dual admission program
Award: $1,000 maximum

Freeman Pollard Diversity Awards
Criteria: Ethnically diverse student; FAFSA required. Additional aid available by application
Award: $1,000/year (on campus); $500/year (off campus)

2020-21 Federal and State Aid

Iowa Tuition Grant
Criteria: based on financial need, Iowa residents only. File FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1, deadline July 1.
Award: $6,200

Federal Pell Grant
Criteria: based on financial need; file FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1
Award: $6,195 maximum

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
Criteria: based on financial need, priority to Pell Grant recipients. File FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1.
Award: $400 maximum

Federal Work Study
Criteria: based on financial need. File FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1
Award: $1,850


2021-22 Scholarships

For transfer students entering during the 2021-22 academic year

PHI THETA KAPPA
Criteria: awarded to all Phi Theta Kappa National Honor Society members transferring from a community college
Award: $16,000

OR

TRANSFER ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS

Criteria: based on GPA
Awards:
3.5-4.00 GPA $15,500 
3.0-3.49 GPA $14,500
2.5-2.99 GPA $13,500 
2.0-2.49 GPA $11,500 

Ambrose Advantage Scholarship
Criteria: Iowa resident, Pell Grant eligible, min. unweighted GPA 2.8, admitted to SAU, full-time enrollment
Award: Full Tuition 

Fr. Welch Alumni Scholarship
Criteria: parent is a St. Ambrose graduate
Award: $1,000 per year (on campus); $500/year (off campus)

Dual Admission Scholarship
Criteria: participant in SAU/community college dual admission program
Award: $1,000 maximum

Freeman Pollard Diversity Award
Criteria: Ethnically diverse student; FAFSA required. Additional aid available by application
Award: $1,000/year (on campus); $500/year (off campus)

2021-22 Federal and State Aid

Iowa Tuition Grant
Criteria: based on financial need, Iowa residents only. File FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1, deadline July 1.
Award: $6,200

Federal Pell Grant
Criteria: based on financial need; file FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1
Award: $6,345 maximum

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
Criteria: based on financial need, priority to Pell Grant recipients. File FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1.
Award: $400 maximum

Federal Work Study
Criteria: based on financial need. File FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1
Award: $1,850

Athletic Scholarships

As a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), St. Ambrose can award athletic scholarships to student-athletes.

These scholarships allow you to earn a college education while competing in the sport that you love. At Ambrose, we embody that value of developing both the mind and body.

How do I qualify for an athletic scholarship?
You must first be eligible to play a sport at St. Ambrose. You can read about those qualifications here. The NAIA also has a complete website on how to register for eligibility at playNAIA.org

With more than 31 varsity athletic teams and state-of-the-art facilities in which to play them, the Fighting Bees of SAU are bold contenders on any field. Watch this video

Fine Arts Scholarships

How do I qualify for a fine arts scholarship? 
Scholarships are awarded based on performance and ability in art, music and theatre. Review the various requirements below:

Outside Scholarships

There are many opportunities to receive scholarships from outside sources, here are a few websites to begin researching your options:

Another tip: Next time you're on campus, check out the bulletin board outside Bee Central where we post more flyers and applications for outside scholarships.


Madison Volpert '18


When Madison came to St. Ambrose, she thought she would spend a standard four years completing her undergraduate degree. Her drive to succeed, and faculty who encouraged and supported her, led Madison to graduate a year early and enter the Doctor of Occupational Therapy program at SAU. "My teachers really helped me have a successful education experience," she said.

Read Madison's story
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Rachel Wiedman

Bachelor of Arts degree, majors in Psychology and History,Class of 2021


Rachel became an Ambrosian in 2017 because we provide the remarkable university community she requires: a supportive environment; opportunities for academic, artistic and spiritual growth; collaboration and discussion; and a collective mission for social justice.

See My Story

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Contact


Jennifer Best, MS Ed, Dept. Coordinator

Psychology Department
518 W. Locust St.
Davenport, IA 52803
BestJenniferA@sau.edu

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